Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Feversong by Karen Marie Moning - Review

#1 New York Times bestselling author Karen Marie Moning returns with the epic conclusion to her pulse-pounding Fever series, where a world thrown into chaos grows more treacherous at every turn. As Mac, Barrons, Ryodan, and Jada struggle to restore control, enemies become allies, right and wrong cease to exist, and the lines between life and death, lust and love, disappear completely.

Black holes loom menacingly over Dublin, threatening to destroy the Earth. Yet the greatest danger is the one MacKayla Lane has unleashed from within: the Sinsar Dubh—a sentient book of unthinkable evil—has possessed her body and will stop at nothing in its insatiable quest for power.

The fate of Man and Fae rests on destroying the book and recovering the long-lost Song of Making, the sole magic that can repair the fragile fabric of the Earth. But to achieve these aims, sidhe-seers, the Nine, Seelie, and Unseelie must form unlikely alliances and make heart-wrenching choices. For Barrons and Jada, this means finding the Seelie Queen who alone can wield the mysterious song, negotiating with a lethal Unseelie prince hell-bent on ruling the Fae courts, and figuring out how to destroy the Sinsar Dubh while keeping Mac alive.

This time, there’s no gain without sacrifice, no pursuit without risk, no victory without irrevocable loss. In the battle for Mac’s soul, every decision exacts a tremendous price.

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Feversong is the conclusion to Mac's and Barron's story in the Fever series. In order to have any idea of what's going on, you have to read at least the majority of the books before it. But if you're all caught up, I have to say that Feversong is a fantastic ending to Mac's story and one of the better, if not best, story in the series thus far. I don't have the expertise to summarize the story so far so this review is going to focus primarily on the story in this book alone. 

This series is incredibly complex, with a lot of characters and developed magical lore and a unique version of Dublin. Sometimes I find it a little too confusing. Who is Barron's? What is Mac, really? Who is the Unseelie King? How the heck can a magical book be so freaking evil? Is all this written in the stars or is it a mess of their own making? WHO KNOWS? NOT ME!

That being said, Feversong does a great job of answering a lot of these questions (but not all). I think that the development of the characters, from Dani/Jada to the Unseelie King and his consort, and then especially with Mac and Barrons, really drives this story forward and helps readers understand what is really going on. I really enjoyed seeing these characters grow and figure out how to save the world from being sucked into a magical black hole. Literally. You also learn more about the Unseelie King and the magic he created for his human consort and how that plays into the problems for Mac and the crew, which makes what might otherwise be seem like a disjointed story more linear. 

At its heart, this book is the story of Mac. Barrons and Jada play a large part as well but I've always felt like Mac is the heart of this series. And in this book, Mac experiences an entire spectrum of highs and lows and everything in between. Even when she makes decisions with the best intentions, horrible things happen. Karen Marie Moning pulls no punches when it comes to violence and darkness and the evil found in the world and Mac takes the brunt of most of it. The person that she comes out of in the end, though, is a revelation and her relationship with Barrons is fantastic. I always felt a little uneasy about the ways they used one another but the way their relationship develops in this book is great and soothed my aching soul (and made the book what it is, I really think).

I don't want to spoil anything, so I feel like I can't say too much more. Basically, I think that Feversong, while sometimes being too ambitious in its storytelling and becoming too convoluted, does a pretty good job in wrangling readers back into the characters and the world and the romance, not only of Mac and Barrons but of humanity with the earth, with the things that people love that are ugly and messed up and utterly human. It stays true to the series by being purposely ambiguous at the end of the true nature of the story, if it was destiny or choice, if the people you thought you knew were more than you were ever told, but if it was all spelled out for us, it would be a fitting ending to this story. Part of the magic that first captured Mac's eye is the mystery of beautiful things like Barrons, and so it's only right that it's what captures reader's eyes as well.

Overall, I think this book is a great ending to the series, as well as one of the stronger books of the series on its own. I highly recommend that even if you had some trouble with some of the Fever books you read this, if only to get some well-deserved answers and some steamy Mac/Barrons romance. 
Find out more about Karen Marie Moning and her works here: https://karenmoning.com

KAREN MARIE MONING is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Fever series, featuring MacKayla Lane, and the award-winning Highlander series. She has a bachelor’s degree in society and law from Purdue University.

You can find her on Facebook at Facebook.com/​KarenMarieMoningfan

You can fin her on Twitter at @KarenMMoning

Happy Reading!


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